Sexual dimorphism

“Mum, just leave me alone, I’m fine!” exclaimed a 70-year old son of a 90-year old mother, with a cold.

“Do you wanna go out on Friday?” read the message he sent on Thursday, but when Friday came he was nowhere to be found.

“I’m not gayyy!” screamed a 10 year old boy.

“She’s also fat, so you don’t need to be jealous” said mr. x.

“Sure, you can come and work anytime you like!” says the professor.

“36? I mean are you 36? We’ve met before, haven’t we?” asked an unknown guy at the carnival, too goodlooking to even be noticed.

“Coffee? I can’t make it Tuesdays or Fridays, but the rest of the time I’m pretty much free…” said someone who studied political science.

“Don’t bother with them, they’re all idiots…” the childhood friend seems to always suggest.

“All women are like animals, governed by their hormones, predominantly concerned with the wellbeing of their offspring and incapable of true love” claimed a 44-year old guy, who read Nietche at adolescence.

“Take care of yourself!” said a good friend, not seen for years.

“Lets drink a shot, yeah?” said the barman.

“You fucken bitch!” screamed the taxi driver.

What are they all thinking? Some of these words make me feel the divide between us. I’m not them, being them is something pretty special, or pretty damned, some seem to believe.

Some other words simply imply a certain divide and then some of them make no inference to gender. Sexual dimorphism is not really present in humans, but culturally manufactured, it’s an illusion that helps out with cultural evolution through segregation – gone too far (due to religion, conservatism and social stress). I listen to this greek indie band to gain insight and what the lyrics always seem to say is that he’s got to go, even though he thinks about her. The singer seems positive and confident that it’s the right thing to do to leave at some or other point. But he unwantingly seems to return, just to leave again, just before the next song is composed. In the end, the entire album is a loop of this guy arriving just for the pleasure of leaving and regaining his freedom. He’s not directly addressing sexual dimorphism, but he is implying he is terrified each time, to find that she is just like any man or boy or human. But he can’t love a boy, so he leaves her again, because finding someone to love for their gender is impossible. Essentially for any relationship to evolve, you need to avoid trying to predetermine its effect on you, while trusting the benefits of arriving at that destination.

Meanwhile she remains hurt, offended and fragile, assisting the superficial vicious spiral, which unfolds its reassuring circumferences for those misguided creatures, who still think they are sexually dimorphic, or at least were meant to be. He never particularly focuses on gender, but it wouldn’t be as bad to do so, as to fail to attribute any kind of characteristic to her. He sings about his own feelings, his own relationship to people, while she is simply a reflection of what he considers a girl to be. It is a very honest and direct depiction of a large number of relationships people around me have with partners in Greece.